Charleston Residential Landscape Design - Sod Problems

New Sod: An Integral Part of Your Charleston Yard Makeover

  In my residential landscape design work, I’ve come across many adjacent yards whose beautifully-designed and maintained beds and paths are tragically sullied by unkempt lawns. I don’t understand the logic: If someone takes enough pride in their yard to spend time and effort perfecting some elements, how could they overlook–literally and figuratively–the largest element,…

Charleston Residential Landscape Design - Camellias 2

Charleston Evergreens: Far More Than Conifers

  Evergreens are valuable elements in residential landscape design because of their permanent nature: They look nearly the same during winter doldrums as they do in the heat of summer. As permanent fixtures, many evergreens–particularly Leland cypresses–make excellent natural partitions, particularly between properties. Many people don’t realize, however, that evergreens include all plants that retain…

Charleston Residential Landscape Design - Rose of Sharon 2

Perennials for Low-Maintenance Residential Landscape Designs

  As a minimalist who prefers low-maintenance residential landscape designs that last for years at a time, I’m a big fan of perennials, plants that return each growing season. Luckily, there’s an abundance of perennials that thrive in the Lowcountry. Of these numerous long-lasting, aesthetically-appealing florae, I have a particularly strong affinity for roses of…

Charleston Residential Landscape Design - Sunset from Sullivan's Island

Goodbye, Charleston Landscaping Summer. Welcome, Charleston Landscaping Fall.

  The Lowcountry offers abundant natural beauty that can be sculpted and/or enhanced to create impressive residential landscape designs. On the other hand, it offers summers of stifling humidity and swarms of blood-sucking mosquitoes. But here, at the end of climatological summer on the first truly cool morning in months, we enter a golden period,…

Charleston Residential Landscape Design - Fungus and Armyworms

Save Your St. Augustine Grass from Fungus & Armyworms

  The recent weeks of frequent heavy rains and consistently-hot and humid air have led to a proliferation of St. Augustine-killing fungus and armyworms. Symptoms include patches of yellowing and/or dead grass in an otherwise healthy lawn that increase in size and multiply after rains. Armyworms, which are actually a type of caterpillar, grow into yellowish…